Is QTP Really Anti-Agile?

I have no experience with QTP. But I know a bit to answer why QTP is or is anti-agile:

1) No support for programming languages like Java, .Net so that it allows it to be used as an acceptance testing tool.

Having an acceptance test tool is very important for the team. QTP automates testing, making it favorable to an agile team.

2) VBSCript doesn’t help in everyone’s participation in the automation process, which is a key in agile projects.

Everyone’s? For example the product owner? If she knew JScript then it would be ok?

3) No IDE support : QTP’s IDE is no way near Ideal hence makes maintainable a tough battle.

Don’t know really. But I’ll get to the tool selection later.

4) NO support for standard IDE like eclipse

Yes, because no .Net projects are agile.

5) Multi browser support is limited

Yes, because all form-based apps are not really agile. Detect a pattern here?

6) Cant execute scripts on Linux and Mac platforms.

Yes, because Windows app… well, you know already.

7) No continuous integration support, makes it raelly tough to be used as an acceptance testing tool.

Maybe, but not all tools have to fit into an acceptance test tool belt.

And last but not the least : Bloody expensive

Price for a tool which makes your life easier (or not) does not really impact it’s agility. I guess “Resharper” is not “agile”. Sheesh.

 

What does an “agile” tool look like?

Well, prepare yourself for a surprise – no such thing. Although some may argue that a whiteboard and sticky notes are agile.

A tool should fit into the process of development as neatly as possible, without causing friction. It should facilitate adding value to the product with a constant velocity for the long run. If it helps the process, cool. If it’s not, try something else. If it costs you, find if that ROI is bigger than one.

And then you can call it “agile”. You’ll probably be the only one calling it “agile”, but hey, you’re definition, not mine.

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